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STV Scottish independence debate

The Scottish Research Society welcomes the outcome of the...

July 24, 2014 Comments (0) Views: 2525 Featured, Plan B

Op Ed: When did being a proud Scot and a unionist become a dirty combination?

With over one billion people viewing the opening ceremony of the Commonwealth Games on Wednesday evening, Scotland was centre stage, showing off its talent and potential to the world. For a fleeting evening, people from the Yes and No sides set aside their differences and called an uneasy truce.

But it was also tinged with sadness because the vacuum created by all the recent acrimony hit home at how big the chasm has become between the Yessers and the Nos. Some might say how can you be a proud Scot and be against independence? To some this is tantamount to being a traitor, for inferring you don’t believe in Scotland. On the contrary, I believe in Scotland. I love it and can’t imagine living anywhere else. It has a lot going for it. But I also recognise that the union is greater than the sum of its parts. I truly believe we can accomplish more together and grow and prosper. I’m with ‘Braveheart’ Highlander Nigel Kirk-Hanlin who made an impassioned declaration on Question Time a fortnight ago about his allegiance to both Scotland and the UK, setting social media alight, with people claiming he was one of the best speakers Question Time has ever had.

There are simply too many unknowns and plenty of downsides to going it alone. The union isn’t perfect, no one is try to say it is, as there have clearly been problems along the way. By the same token, the Scottish government certainly isn’t perfect either. While I can understand why people are pushing for change that doesn’t mean we have to break up to get that change. The team isn’t broken, we just need better team players.

 

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